On John Oliver quitting The Daily Show

The Guardian’s website has a short piece on some comments from John Oliver about quitting The Daily Show and his forthcoming programme for HBO. If you haven’t seen the moment where he gets choked up on his final appearance, it’s here.

I first met John back in 2007, when I had a small hand in setting up The Bugle podcast which he and Andy Zaltzman have now been doing for the last seven years. I had recently established the multimedia department at The Times and, after some early success with some football related podcasts with Frank Skinner and David Baddiel, was looking for some new comedy ideas.

John and Andy came in and pitched the idea of doing a satirical podcast – the audio newspaper for the visual world – and the idea for The Bugle was born.

At that stage, John hadn’t been in New York long, so there was no doubt an attraction for him in keeping a profile going in the UK. It also gave him the chance to continue working with Andy. They’d already had some success as a writing duo – particularly with the Political Animal shows for Radio 4.

For The Times, the podcast was breaking new ground. There were no studio facilities in the Wapping office. Each week the podcast producer would head to a studio in west London with Andy, while John would go into a studio in New York, sometimes accompanied by Rory Albanese — the glorious American. It was recorded early afternoon on a Friday because it was the only day John was guaranteed not to have any commitments at The Daily Show. Then the producer would take the raw audio back to Wapping to edit. In theory, the show was supposed to go out on a Monday but we quickly got into the habit of releasing it Friday afternoon, so everyone could get down the pub without worrying about it all weekend.

I think it’s fair to say that not everyone on The Times was completely committed to the idea. There was a degree of uncertainty about whether the project would ever get off the ground. But it was forced through by the paper’s then Executive Editor, Keith Blackmore, who was completely supportive and who came along to the recording of the pilot.

At some point during a rather chaotic recording, John and Andy decided to launch into a long routine about the evils of Rupert Murdoch, which Keith bore with equanimity.

The following week, I met with Keith and presented him with a polished half hour pilot for distribution among News International’s various executives. At this point he asked, rather shame-faced, if I would cut the Murdoch material.

But, determined as I was that the show wouldn’t be derailed by institutional timidity, I’d already made the cuts. Through some sleight of hand, and by keeping John and Andy a little in the dark, we got the podcast approved and promoted by the paper.

The Bugle ran for four years with the Times. Sadly, the paper never really championed it as it should have done, which I continue to think was a great shame. I always thought it was a brilliant product, showcasing John and Andy’s great talents for both scripted satire and genius improvisation. I think a huge part of its success is that John and Andy sound like they’re having fun. In the pilot, we cut a lot of the giggling at each other’s jokes – but as time has gone on it has become a trademark feature. The Bugle also owed a lot to the hard work of producers Tom Wright and later, after I’d left The Times, Chris Skinner.

After the launch, The Times turned its attention away from podcasts to web video as the prime focus for the multimedia team. So, The Bugle always had a slightly odd position as the only comedy podcast supported by the paper. But it steadily built up an audience and it always pleases me to see it referenced in the comments whenever The Guardian runs a story on John.

So, best of luck John with the new show. And I hope The Bugle continues for many years to come. With that, there’s just one more thing to say:

Fuck you, Chris.

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Author: Matt Walsh

Journalist

4 thoughts on “On John Oliver quitting The Daily Show”

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